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Hercules Release Versions


Note +++ Note +++ Note +++ Note +++ Note +++ Note +++ Note +++ Note +++ Note +++ Note

There is a new binary distribution available.  It does not require CYGWIN
in any form or flavour, as it is built using a native Windows based compiler
(Microsoft Visual Studio C++ Express).  These binaries are available from

To use those new binaries, unpack/install them into a directory in your path,
and run the hercules executable.  That's all

Note +++ Note +++ Note +++ Note +++ Note +++ Note +++ Note +++ Note +++ Note +++ Note

This article is about the production release versions of Hercules. If you are interested in a more current version from the developers' source tree, take a look at the Hercules Snapshot page

There is a small article on How to build the Hercules binaries on Windows which describes in a step-by-step manner how to create the Hercules executables. If that effort seems too much for you, you might consider to download pre-built binaries by clicking on the appropriate field in the table below

Software prerequisites for Windows

If you want to run the prebuilt binaries you will need a small subset of the Cygwin package, basically the runtime environment.

In order to build your own binaries you will need a more or less complete development environment of Cygwin. For more information take a look at the Installing Cygwin document.

The latest prebuilt windows binaries for Hercules 3.04 have been built using Cygwin 1.5.15. It is therefore recommended that you use this or a higher level of Cygwin for running the binaries

Software prerequisites for Linux

I don't think you need any special software on your Linux box to build binaries from the source archives. To compile your own binaries you will need normal development tools, like gcc, make, etc.

Using the Source Archives

Once you have acquired the necessary software tools (see above) you need to do the following

  1. If you are running on a Windows machine you should now invoke a bash session by clicking on the Cygwin symbol on your desktop or by entering the bash command in a Windows command box
  2. Create a directory hercdist somewhere on your system using
       mkdir -p /hercdist
      
  3. Download the Hercules source archive (see below) and place it into the directory you just created
  4. In this directory, run the following command:
       tar -xvzf hercules-V.RR.tar.gz
                          | |
                          | +-------- release
                          +---------- version
      
    where hercules-V.RR.tar.gz is the name of the distribution archive for version V and release RR will create a new directory hercdist/hercules-V.RR
  5. In this newly created directory enter the commands
        ./configure && make && make install-strip
       
    In order to find out which configuration options are available you should enter
        ./configure --help | less
       
Voila

                     Version 3.02 RELEASE NOTES

- TODO

                     Version 3.01 RELEASE NOTES


- Support for z990 crypto instructions is conditional on the presence of the
  glibcrypt library.

  If Hercules is BUILT, the development files for glibcrypt should be available.

  When hercules is RUN, the runtime files for glibcrypt should be installed.

  Depending on the level of glibcrypt used to *build* hercules, the associated
  level of glibcrypt should also be present on the target machine. On systems
  supporting shared library versioning, multiple levels of the glibcrypt
  runtime libraries can be installed simultaneously, ensuring availability
  of the z990 crypto instructions, regardless of the level of glibcrypt with
  which hercules was initially built.


- CTC and LCS devices now ++MUST++ specify ALL addresses on the configuration
  statement.

  Example:

    0A00.2     LCS .....
    0B00.2     CTCI ....

     or

    0A00.4     LCS -oat hercules.oat

     or

    0A00-0A03  LCS -oat hercules.oat

     or

    0A00    LCS -oat hercules.oat
    0A01    LCS
    0A02    LCS
    0A03    LCS

  Previously (i.e. with version 3.00), only the first (even numbered) device
  needed to be defined and Herc would automatically define the odd numbered
  device for you. Starting with Hercules version 3.01 however, you now need
  to define BOTH devices, just like you did with versions prior to 3.00.

  Once again, starting with version 3.01, you **MUST** define BOTH DEVICES.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     Version 3.00 RELEASE NOTES


- Reminder that CTCI device handling was changed as follows:

  - The CTCI-W32 protocol is deprecated. You should use the CTCI protocol
    instead.

  - You MUST NOT define both even/odd CTCI device pairs in your configuration
    file. You should ONLY define the first even numbered device. Hercules will
    automatically define the odd numbered device for you. If you define the
    odd numbered device by mistake, an open error will occur on that device.
    This is by design. See the README.NETWORKING document for further details.


- Hercules Dynamic Loader support: starting with version 3.00, Hercules now
  contains support for the dynamic loading of certain modules upon startup on
  some platforms (e.g. Linux and Windows for example). As a result of this new
  feature, "Hercules" itself now no longer consists of just the 'hercules.exe'
  module by itself, but rather consists of BOTH the 'hercules.exe' program AS
  WELL AS whatever dynamic modules (DLLs) that accompany it.

  As a result if this change, whenever you install a new version of Hercules,
  you must ensure that you ALSO install the accompanying new versions of the
  new dynamic modules as well. Attempting to use a version of Hercules with a
  dynamic module that was not specifically built for that version will cause
  loading of that dynamic module to fail.

  You CANNOT mix versions of Hercules with differing versions of dynamically
  loaded modules.

  Ensure that your library path LD_LIBRARY_PATH is set correctly such that it
  includes the directory of your Hercules executables. Especially, message
  HHCCF042E will indicate that system is unable to locate necessary loadable
  modules.


- ECPS:VM: Do not use ECPS:VM (See README.ECPSVM) in an AP or MP environment
  in VM/370. If AP=YES or MP=YES is coded in DMKSYS and the AP/MP control
  file is used to build the CP nucleus and NUMCPU is set to more than 1 in
  the hercules.cnf file, any of LOK001, LOK003 or other abends will occur.
  This occurs because the Hercules ECPS:VM CP Assist implementation is not
  MP safe, and particularily, attemps VM dispatching without holding necessary
  AP or MP locks.


- Due to the change in Hercules' "mainstor" memory allocation technique to
  address a "double memory consumption" bug in Cygwin's malloc implementation,
  some Windows Hercules users may experience an "out of memory" error whenever
  Hercules is started with a large MAINSIZE configuration file value:

      "HHCCF031S Cannot obtain nnnMB main storage"

  This error will most likely occur (if it does at all) for those users who
  have manually adjusted their Cygwin "heap_chunk_in_mb" Windows registry
  setting value (in order to allow them to specify a large MAINSIZE value
  when running Hercules). If this problem does occur (i.e. if you DO happen
  to experience the above mentioned "HHCCF031S Cannot obtain main storage"
  error with this new release of Hercules), then either REDUCE your "heap_
  chunk_in_mb" value (yes, that's correct: REDUCE it; i.e. change it to a
  SMALLER value) or else remove it altogether (so as to let it default).

  Detailed explanation:

  History/background: Cygwin has a built-in limit to the amount of memory
  that may be allocated in one chunk. If you try 'malloc'ing more than this
  limit, you will receive an "out of memory" error. Since many Hercules users
  specify large MAINSIZE values in their configuration file, they sometimes
  experience this problem.

  The suggested workaround to this "problem" was to add a "heap_chunk_in_mb"
  registry value to Cygwin's registry settings with a large enough value such
  that Cygwin would then be able to satisfy Hercules' 'malloc' request for
  such a large MAINSIZE value.

  This worked fine until sometime around version 1.3.15 of Cygwin, at which
  time they began using a different 'malloc' technique that unfortunately
  causes TWICE as much Windows virtual memory to be allocated for any large
  memory allocation (the technical reasons of which are explained in comments
  in source member config.c where mainsize is being allocated).

  In order to address this double memory allocation issue in Cygwin's malloc
  implementation, Hercules was changed to use mmap to allocate its mainstor
  rather than malloc (which, unlike malloc, does NOT inadvertently allocate
  twice as Windows virtual storage than was requested), which did indeed re-
  solve the "double memory allocation" problem.

  Unfortunately however, because Cygwin's malloc and mmap logic each consume
  completely different portions of Windows' virtual memory, the more memory
  that is reserved for malloc usage (via using a larger "heap_chunk_in_mb"
  value), the LESS becomes available for mmap usage!

  Thus, while increasing your "heap_chunk_in_mb" registry value USED to HELP
  [to allow you to allocate larger amounts of mainstor (MAINSIZE)], it NOW
  causes the complete OPPOSITE effect: it ends up PREVENTING you from being
  able to 'mmap' as much storage as you'd like to have!

  Conclusion:

  Therefore, if you are currently using the "heap_chunk_in_mb" registry value
  setting to allow you to allocate large MAINSIZE values, then starting with
  version 3.00 of Hercules you need to DESCREASE your "heap_chunk_in_mb" value
  (or remove it altogether and let it default) in order to leave enough memory
  remaining for Hercules (Cygwin actually) to be able to satisfy its 'mmap'
  request for your desired MAINSIZE amount.

Available Hercules Versions

The following Hercules versions are currently available for download:


Available Source Archives and precompiled binaries
Source Archive Precompiled Binaries
CPU Windows Linux OSX
Emulated Processors
2 8
Hercules Version: 3.04
Release Date: 2006-02-22
Cygwin Version: 1.5.15
Source Archive: Click to download
i586 Click to download Click to download Click to download Click to download
i686 Click to download Click to download
p4 Click to download Click to download
Hercules Version: 3.03.1
Release Date: 2005-12-31
Cygwin Version: 1.5.15
Source Archive: Click to download
i586 Click to download Click to download Click to download Click to download
i686 Click to download Click to download
p4 Click to download Click to download
Hercules Version: 3.03
Release Date: 2005-12-21
Cygwin Version: 1.5.15
Source Archive: Click to download
i586 Click to download Click to download Click to download Click to download
i686 Click to download Click to download
p4 Click to download Click to download
Hercules Version: 3.02
Release Date: 2004-12-11
Cygwin Version: 1.5.12
Source Archive: Click to download
i586 Click to download Click to download Click to download Click to download
i686 Click to download Click to download
p4 Click to download Click to download
Hercules Version: 3.01
Release Date: 2003-12-01
Cygwin Version: 1.5.5
Source Archive: Click to download
i586 Click to download Click to download Click to download Click to download
i686 Click to download Click to download
p4 Click to download Click to download
Hercules Version: 3.00
Release Date: 2003-10-03
Cygwin Version: 1.5.5
Source Archive: Click to download
i586 Click to download Click to download Click to download Click to download
i686 Click to download Click to download
p4 Click to download Click to download
Hercules Version: 2.17.1
Release Date: 2003-02-09
Cygwin Version: 1.3.22
Source Archive: Click to download
i586 Click to download Click to download Click to download Click to download
i686 Click to download Click to download
p4 Click to download Click to download

Which CPU Type?

i386
Any Intel processor i80386 and upwards. Not that we expect many of those to still be around. 32 bit windows operating systems don't even run om 80386 processors, but Linux systems might
i586
Any Pentium class CPU qualifies for this CPU type. If you have an older Pentium based PC, or a PC based on an Athlon K processor, you should choose the i586 row from the download Arrray
i686
The i686 CPU type include all processors from the Pentium Pro processor onwards. If you have PC with a Pentium III processor this should probably be the row to choose from the download array
p4
The P4 (=Pentium 4) processor processors from the Pentium Pro processor onwards. If you have a modern PC this should probably be the row to choose from the download array

Which Thread Model

fthread
Fish (aka David B. Trout) has developed an optimized threading model for Hercules running in a Cygwin environment, which obviously is called fish-thread or fthread. You should normally choose the fthread col from the download array.
pthread
The Cygwin system comes with its own posix compliant thread model, called pthread. The pthread model is no longer supported by Hercules. You must use the fthread model for Hercules 3.03 and later

Enjoy your private Hercules mainframe



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